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Спасибо

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Рейтинг 5.00 (4 Голосов)

Helmets

A “Bellows faced” Close Helmet, German, ca. 1530, housed at the Art Institute of Chicago.

A Kawari Kabutō, Japan, Edo period, ca. 19th century

An interesting Victorian era Close helmet reproduction, Paris, France, ca. 1875, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

An interesting Corinthian style bronze helmet, Greek, ca. mid 6th century BC, from Christie’s Auction House.

A classic example of a Great Bascinet, Italian, ca. mid to late 15th century, housed at the Musée de l'Armée.

A lovely etched and gilt Close Helm, Augsburg, Germany, ca. 1560-1570, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

An interesting Close Helmet, English or Flemish, ca. 1560, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A gilt Chichak, Ottoman or Syrian, ca. 16th century, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

An interesting Close Helmet, German, ca. 1510, housed at the Art Institute of Chicago.

A bronze helmet with a standing horse figure, China, Zhou Dynasty, ca. 7th century BC, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Турнирный щит. Германия. A tournament Targa, Germany, ca. 1500, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A lovely Ilyrian style bronze helmet, Greek, ca. 5th century BC, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A lovely jousting Targe, probably Nuremberg, Germany, ca. 1450, housed at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

A “Hand Pavise” or Targe/Targa/Target. This style of shield has so many names. Germany, ca. late 15th century, housed at the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wien.

A bronze Cuirass of the type the Romans would have called Lorica Musculata, Apulia, Greece, ca. 4th century BC, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A bronze Chalcidian helmet with a Griffin Crest, Balkan or Greek, ca. 4th century BC, from Hermann Historica.

An interesting lamellar helmet, Siberia, possibly ca. 1730, housed at the National Museum of Finland.

A helmet of the Bhutanese Royal Guard, Bhutan, ca. 18th or 19th century

A lovely tournament Burgonet, French, ca. 1600-1615, housed at the Hermitage Museum.

A composite armor assembled from pieces made for the Gioco del Ponte, Italy, ca. 17th century, though assembled at a later date, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 

A fantastic and intimidating War Mask, Iran, ca. 19th century

A gorgeously decorated helmet with fantastic gilding and studded with turquoise and coral, Chinese, Qing Dynasty, ca. 18th century, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

An Armet in the grotesque style, German, possibly Nuremberg, ca. 1520-1530, housed at the Royal Armoury of Turin.

A lovely fluted Close Helmet wrongly labeled as an Armet by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, German, ca. 1510-1525.

French zischagge, circa 1630-40.

A lovely composite armor consisting of a dō, kotē, and sodē, Japan, late Edo-early Meiji period, ca. 19th century

Korean helmet, 19th century. From The Hermitage Museum

16th century Portuguese armor patterned after Samurai armor.

A Pikeman’s Kettle Helmet, Dutch made but adopted for use in Japan, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. When guns were adopted in Japan, this also lead to limited adoption of European armor, due to the fact that European armor was better suited to deflecting gunshots than the Japanese armor was.

A Sallet in the “Venetian style” covered in velvet, Venice, Italy, Sallet ca. 1460, decoration probably ca. 17th century and later, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A Sallet with velvet covering and brass gilt fluer -de-lys added in the 19th century, North Italy, ca. 1470, housed at the Royal Armouries.

An Armet for the tournament with a reinforcing faceplate (pictured above on and off), attributed to Kolman Helmschmid, Germany, Augsburg, ca. 1515-1520, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 

the Kettle Hat

They are effective helmets but with very little face protection (people often say no face protection, but forget that the rim is actually a form of face protection because it will stop or deflect blows coming down from above.)

This lack of facial plates is what gives them completely unrestricted vision and breathing however, very useful things on the field of battle.

the Bascinet

it leans more toward being like an Armet.

So, in terms of the Corinthian helmet itself, it’s quite the middle-of-the-road helmet. It offers good protection, especially against cuts, and also offers only slightly restricted vision and breathing.

An Armet style Siege Helmet, French, ca. 1600-1650, housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A lovely fluted Close Helmet wrongly labeled as an Armet by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, German, ca. 1510-1525.

The infamous Horned Helmet, belonging to an armor presented to King Henry VIII by emperor Maximilian I in 1514, attributed to Konrad Seusenhofer, made in Austria, Innsbruck, ca. 1512, housed at the Royal Armouries Leeds.

Thanks


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